images1

Kyphosis

Main Content

Bone-Spur_04

Click on the following conditions to learn more:

Kyphosis

buildingdisc3

The spine is divided into three sections: the cervical spine or neck, the thoracic spine or mid back, and the lumbar spine or low back. Each of these sections has a specific, normal curve to it. The cervical spine looks like a backward “C”, which is called a lordotic curve. The thoracic spine has a regular “C” shape with the opening of the “C” in the front of your body, which is called a kyphotic curve. The lumbar spine, like the cervical spine, also has a backward “C” shape or lordotic curve.

Kyphosis is the term used to describe a type of abnormal curve in the spine in which there is too much forward curve in the spine. Kyphosis can have varying symptoms and degrees of severity, from minor changes in the shape of your spine to severe deformity, nerve problems, and chronic pain. The larger the abnormal curve, the more serious the problem.

Kyphosis is most common in the thoracic spine, though it can also affect the cervical and lumbar spine.

Kyphosis in the thoracic spine exaggerates the natural curve of the thoracic spine. Kyphosis in the cervical or lumbar spine is a condition in which the normal inward curve of the spine reverses. This causes an abnormal forward curve in the spine.

Methods of treating kyphosis have evolved over time. Today there are numerous effective treatment options for correcting a severe kyphotic deformity.

There are a number of different types and causes of kyphosis. Each of these is discussed in detail below along with specific symptoms and approaches to diagnosis and treatment.

subscribe

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST.

Be the first to learn about health and scoliosis research and special events.